• HeyAlishaPatrice

TOP 5 ‘MUST READ’ BOOKS BY BLACK AUTHORS FROM THE LAST 5 YEARS

Updated: Apr 15

The following books by black authors were published within the last 5 years and fall under a wide range of genres. In addition to making great gifts, these must-reads should be added to your list of books to dive into if you have not yet had the pleasure of reading them yet.


1. BECOMING by MICHELLE OBAMA


This book and author need very little introduction, Becoming is former first lady Michelle Obama’s blockbuster memoir that launched in November 2018—and is taking the world by storm. Mrs. 44, a powerhouse in her own right, shot up the charts at record speed, becoming an instant New York Times No. 1 best-seller. Becoming is thought-provoking, inspiring, has refreshing humor, and in some parts, is outright heart-wrenching. Prepare to be moved at a soul level and have tissues nearby.







2. THE HATE YOU GIVE by ANGIE THOMAS


Though Thomas’s story is heartbreakingly topical, its greatest strength is in its authentic depiction of a teenage girl, her loving family, and her attempts to reconcile what she knows to be true about their lives with the way those lives are depicted — and completely undervalued — by society at large.












3. BROWN GIRL DREAMING by JACQUELINE WOODSON



This is a book full of poems that cry out to be learned by heart. These are poems that will, for years to come, be stored in our bloodstream.















4. BLEND: The Secret to Co-Parenting and Creating a Balanced Family By MASHONDA TIFRERE



Blend chronicles how Tifrere, after splitting from Swizz Beatz, worked with her ex-husband and his new wife (Alicia Keys) to create a loving family unit for her son, Kasseem. Written with the blessing of both Swizz Beatz and Keys — he wrote a chapter and she provided a foreword — the book offers advice on how to effectively coparent, which, the publisher noted, ‘is a challenge now faced by nearly half of all American adults



5. HOMEGOING By YAA GYASI

It’s impossible not to admire the ambition and scope of ‘Homegoing,’ and thanks to Ms. Gyasi’s instinctive storytelling gifts, the book leaves the reader with a visceral understanding of both the savage realities of slavery and the emotional damage that is handed down, over the centuries, from mothers to daughters, fathers to sons. At its best, the novel makes us experience the horrors of slavery on an intimate, personal level; by its conclusion, the characters’ tales of loss and resilience have acquired an inexorable and cumulative emotional weight.







©2020 by heyAlishaPatrice.